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I Can Hear the Cuckoo: Life in the Wilds of Wales

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The author’s descriptions of grief were quite well written but for the other aspects of her life that the book covers I wanted to tell her to just get a grip. It's difficult to tell at first whether Kiran is living in Wales properly as she initially mentions spending only weekends there. By the time I approached the end, I was shedding tears thinking about my own life, my own losses and my efforts to understand what they mean and live consciously and mindfully.

I gradually learned how to read it - this wasn’t my usual fare of “space opera” where one explosion leads the protagonist to deliver a stunning treatise on AI and humanity. I Can Hear the Cuckoo is a tender, philosophical memoir about the beauty of a microscopic life, the value of solitariness, and respecting the rhythm and timing of the earth. Kiran has written so movingly about her experiences, in which she takes the reader on the journey of both joy and heartache. Here is a tender, philosophical memoir about the beauty of a microscopic life, the value of solitariness, and respecting the rhythm and timing of the earth.

The film won Best Documentary Short Film at Tribeca Film Festival 2022, beating over 7,000 submissions and 20 finalists. I often forget to read the NetGalley books I have downloaded if I have a lot of library books out but I did fill out a recent survey and it asked a lot of questions about its Shelf app. But she quickly discovers a sense of belonging in the small, close-knit community she finds there; her neighbour Sarah, who teaches her how to sledge when the winter snow arrives; Jane, a 70-year-old woman who lives at the top of a mountain with three dogs and four alpacas with an inspiring attitude for life; and Wilf, the farmer who eats the same supper every day, and taught Kiran that the cuckoo arrives in April and leaves in July. I also didn’t notice it was one of those NetGalley books that’s only available through the Shelf app, which makes for a less smooth reading experience: more on that later. For me this is a book that gives hope,it casts acceptance we’re there is dark and like a breeze in any season,the story whaffs over you in subtle and meaningful ways,and brings new thoughts to life,thoughts and feelings that have simmered over time, come to the surface.

They’re helped to settle in by the people from the B’n’B they stay in on their first visit, people with their own family troubles, and they get to know other residents and incomers, including the farmer, Wilf, with whom Sidhu has profound conversations that often make them both weep.

I picked up this book as living away from the city is an aspiration but this book is about so much more. I have always believed ‘memoir’ as a genre is a tough nut to crack; it is because you have to tell your real-life (boring) story in an immersive tone and pace to keep your readers engaged - not an easy task by any means. What I enjoyed was the style of writing and the discoveries she made while she was living this more rural, isolated life. The power of centering ourselves in the world is not to be understated and Kiran Sidhu conveys this wonderfully. About the Author: Kiran Sidhu is a freelance journalist and has written features, lifestyle and opinion pieces for The Guardian, Observer, Telegraph, The i Paper, The Independent, Metro, Woman magazine, Woman's Own and Breathe magazine.

Healing happens, and acceptance that the expected ways are not always the best ones, especially around Christmas, the time her mother passed away, which now is the most painful season. This book is divided into four sections, classified according to the seasonal changes that accompany the various other demands upon people, their work, food, culture, and so on and so forth.

Kiran Sidhu's book is a bit different as it's not solely about grief and death, although that's the underlying backstory.

You can change your choices at any time by visiting Cookie preferences, as described in the Cookie notice. Having moved first to rural west Wales and then to a small town in Powys, it’d be interesting to compare the experiences of relocating – though of course there’s evidently more to this book than just moving house.This was like medicine - to be taken in small quantities, to help illuminate thoughts and feelings within me that I never would give myself a chance to experience. Well, I see this will be available in paperback in September this year, so I’m encouraged – though it may already be in our library. Anyway, I don’t normally read bereavement memoirs, which is what I think this would be counted as, as I was more attracted by the subtitle, “Life in the Wilds of Wales” and the author’s name, which indicated some kind of South Asian heritage. It felt as if this was used as padding and could have been easily replaced by a deeper drilling down into her experiences of not only being an outsider but a woman of Indian descent in an otherwise white monoculture. but she quickly discovers a sense of belonging in the small, close-knit community she finds there; her neighbour Sarah, who teaches her how to sledge when the winter snow arrives; Jane, a 70-year-old woman who lives at the top of a mountain with three dogs and four alpacas with an inspiring attitude for life; and Wilf, the farmer who eats the same supper every day, and taught Kiran that the cuckoo arrives in April and leaves in July.

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